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Wtf Gamers? Premature Maturation: A Question of Quality vs Time.

If you read the title more than once, then props to my team at KKEnt for the help. I welcome you all to this week’s WTF Gamers?!? in which I will be talking about how games need that time to be the right game to enjoy. It has been apparent that games have increased in release almost every week and honestly, the selection has been quite dull. The best example I can come up with is the recent release of Naughty Dog’s game The Last of Us; which features a strong campaign and a flawless multi-player. It is apparent that Naughty Dog has been working on this title for over three and a half years; which has been extremely intense. So this question has been asked for a long time now, “What is more important? Quality or Time?”

In my experience with gamers, I hear a lot of complaining about a game taking too long in development. People seem to demand it comes out now. However, when it finally does release, it’s not what they expected, and they end up returning it for a laughable amount of trade-in money. That’s a whole other subject that we shall not touch base on…for now… but apparently the developers are getting some notion that we need these games right now. I want to know what census they are conducting where we are asking for games to come out almost every Tuesday of each month. Surfjafo brought to my attention that if developers just concentrated on the game, instead of trying to top one another; they would have a better title. I might have phrase that wrong, but I understand the concept of the anxiety of if your product is better, so you tend to trip up on your own work. I asked a round table of admins and civilians to give off their thoughts on the matter.

Serafin Santiago Jr.:

“I say take your time. Rushing a product to the finish line is like a virgin alone in a room with their mate. Can anyone say premature ejaculation?”

Those were some strong choice of words, but the rushed statement is to the point and so far in history no one enjoys early boo boo juice. The worst of the worst when I witnessed this first hand at a Sega event where I got a chance to try out the Thor and Captain America games, which were both coming out in the same year. Thor was slated for May, and the game I played was 2 months from that release. It looked as if it were completed just days ago. The thing is– I just took it as it was a game still in development, and they just wanted to show off the product they had. I know what you’re thinking– when it comes to games based on comic books, the movies are hardly ever good, but we’ve had some decent titles, lately. Either way, the game finally released and it looked like the same prototype I played at the event. It had the same glitches, the same graphics and even color drops at times. My only reaction was, “WTF IS THIS ASS-GUARDIAN BS?!?” This, in turn, made me think about the Captain America game, which looked finished and was to be released four months away. The funny part is while the developer let me play on the Ps3 console with the 3D glasses; he was upset that I put the title on the hardest difficulty and went through it without a problem. I had to explain that the title was tough; I am just that good of a gamer. The gameplay was similar to Rocksteady’s Batman Arkham Asylum, with the same graphics and same fighting mechanics, which fit really well for the super soldier.

This is also can be said for the systems and how the companies rush to get  product out first. In 2005, Microsoft released the Xbox 360, which came out a year later before the Ps3 and Nintendo Wii. They may have had an early lead, but the system had the red ring and pretty much everything went downhill from there. Do not take this as me taking a shot at MS, because I stuck with them since the beginning of their Xbox debut, but if I were to calculate how many systems I went through for the 360, it would be in the double-digits, and I do mean the high double-digits. The same thing is happening now with the Nintendo WiiU. Not that the system is buggy, but since they took an early start, they really are falling short on the fans. It is a fine gaming system and pretty much the only system sticking to the idea of gaming only, but they re-hashed a lot of games that already came out and then people come looking for new titles which you hardly have. The few good titles are not really geared for everyone– mostly fan-based– for example: Monster Hunter Tri. We all know it is a great game and Capcom took their time in making this title, but not really geared for everyone. Now here is a statement from writer Shaynell:

“I feel developers believe they have a finalized product. They wouldn’t release the game if they didn’t. I don’t think time it’s necessarily an issue as much as money is.

They do what they can with the budget they’re allotted. Corners will be cut and sacrifices will be made…

I agree with that statement, but only to an extent. Many independent developers work on titles with little-to-no budget, and they are amazing. I would use the example of Limbo and the Shank series, which both are side scrolled titles, but fall under different genres. The success of the independent market could be because they are not tied to the rules of the big-named companies. They take their time and bring out a game that is meant to be fun, and even though it is less superior in graphics, it is still a great experience!

This would be the time to speak out to the developers. We are about to break into the new consoles and that means a whole new level of gaming. I say we speak our minds, because gaming is an expensive experience and now we honestly want to feel satisfied when spending $59.99 for a title, or better yet, if you really want to get technical with season passes added, we are truly spending close to $90 for one game. So developers, whomever is pushing you to meet a certain deadline, please let them know that your fans– the gamers and the people that are paying for your checks– want you to take your time and really study your games. We do appreciate your hard work, but don’t make us feel like suckers for when we buy into your product. Stay frosty gamers!

Example of a good multiplayer game with intense situations.


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